(260) 432-1542

 

AAHA

Westside Animal Hospital
4550 Illinois Rd.
Fort Wayne, IN 46804
P: 260.432.1542
F: 260.432.8996
E:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Paws and Consider...

The online blog of Westside Animal Hospital — important healthcare information to help you take the best care of your pet!

Recent blog posts

Posted by on in Medical Trends

The emerging tick story:

Whatever you thought you knew about ticks five years ago is rapidly changing.

Posted by on in Cases

Sophie, normally a very active little Papillon, presented to us a few weeks ago because she wasn't feeling well.  Her owner said that Sophie seemed to have been fighting a "bug" for the last few weeks.  She had been having diarrhea on and off and had vomited the day before she came to see us.

Posted by on in Medical Trends

We frequently see patients (puppies & kittens) whose owners inform us they were told by the prior owner or breeder that their pet had its "first shots."  What does this term really mean?  Misunderstanding can unfortunately put your new pet at risk.

Posted by on in Alerts

Did you know that the Halloween season is one of the most dangerous times for pets?

Posted by on in News

Are your pets adequately protected against fleas?  This fall is shaping up to be a bad one for fleas.

Posted by on in Cases

Thomas had gotten himself into trouble the evening before he presented to us.  He was a one-year-old domestic shorthair cat, and he had apparently been in a fight with another animal outside.  He had fared OK — with one exception; his tail had sustained a degloving injury.

Posted by on in Cases

Gus is a very sweet 10-year-old terrier mix.  He presented for an exam a little over a year ago after his owner noticed that his haircoat was becoming thin.  On further questioning, his owner also said that Gus had been drinking more water and had a ravenous appetite.  He tended to pant excessively and was somewhat more lethargic.

It looks like spring is finally here.  Although most of us welcome the end of winter, the warmer temperatures can usher in a new set of problems for your pet.

Posted by on in Alerts

Baylisascaris:  odds are good that you haven't heard of this parasite.  I wasn't familiar with it either until my second year of veterinary school.

Posted by on in Medical Trends

The science behind canine and feline vaccination has received a lot of attention over the past 10-15 years.  The old-school practice of "every pet gets a shot for everything every year" has fallen by the wayside.  The issue of vaccination safety has largely driven this change in thinking and practice.  Feline vaccine safety has been especially high-profile and is the focus of today's blog post.

If you'd like the simple take-home message, it is:  Westside Animal Hospital follows the most current recommendations from top experts in feline vaccination.

If you'd like a bit more information, read on...

Posted by on in Alerts

The holidays are a wonderful time to be with family and friends, but there is also a potentially greater risk to your pet.

In this blog post, I want to focus on a local organization that is easily taken for granted: Fort Wayne Animal Care and Control (FWACC).

Posted by on in Cases

We've lost two wonderful canine patients at Westside over the past few months to the same disease. Tesse was a sweet Lab mix, and Mayzee was a wonderful Beagle mix. Both presented for somewhat similar symptoms, and both were ultimately diagnosed with the same serious illness.

Posted by on in Cases

Nippy is a sweet 11-year-old spayed female Cocker Spaniel, and she presented to us recently after her owner noticed spots of blood on the floor. She appeared to be in good health overall, but the source of the blood was a bleeding mass on her belly.

Posted by on in Alerts

For years, residential rodenticides like D-Con have contained anticoagulants (such as brodifacoum or bromodialone) as their active ingredients.  Anticoagulants work by causing hemorrhage (bleeding) in the animals that ingest them. 

Posted by on in Cases

gracie1She just wasn't herself.  Gracie was normally a sweet, outgoing yellow Labrador, but her owner noticed one evening that Gracie was panting and drooling — not her typical behavior.  A swelling began developing over Gracie's right cheek, so her owner brought her in for an exam the next day.  What had happened to Gracie?  A bee sting or wound perhaps?

Posted by on in News

Did you know that over 800,000 Americans receive medical treatment for dog bites each year?  Children are bitten most often, and their injuries can be devastating — even life-threatening.

Tagged in: news

Posted by on in Cases

Breeze felt terrible!  She presented to us recently after a 24-hour bout of diarrhea.  Her owner initially wasn't too concerned; Breeze was prone to eating things she shouldn't and had experienced diarrhea before.  But this time was different...

Posted by on in Cases

Mindy is a 9-year old Shih Tzu, and she presented for a somewhat bizarre set of symptoms.  Her owner reported that Mindy would shake and tremble as if in pain.  Oddly, this would most often occur after she had eaten — sometimes within 5 minutes of eating.  On a few occasions, she would assume a "praying" position with her head lowered and her hind end elevated.  What was going on with Mindy?

Posted by on in Cases

Poor Frankie was sick.  He presented to us after a three-day history of a poor appetite, diarrhea, and lethargy.  Frankie was a very nice two-year-old neutered male Mastiff (although not very happy on the day of presentation due to his illness).  Although Frankie was able to walk, he would soon flop down on the floor from weakness after just a few steps.  What could be wrong with such a young dog?  Frankie looked terrible!

Posted by on in Drugs

Cortisone — a broad class of drugs commonly used in both human and veterinary medicine.

Cortisone medications are one of the most important and most commonly-used classes of drugs in modern medicine, and we get a lot of questions about their use.  "Cortisone" is a more common term for "corticosteroid."  When some pet owners hear the term "steroid," they may think of steroids of abuse, such as those used by some weight lifters and athletes.  Steroids of abuse — more correctly called "anabolic steroids" — are very different from the corticosteroids commonly used in medicine.

Today's blog post is meant to help educate you on cortisone's uses, misuses, and side effects.  Hopefully you will learn how valuable this class of medications can be, as well as better understand how to safely use these medications in your pet.  Click 'Continue reading' below to read more...

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